Alcohol Cited In Holiday Boating Accident On Biscayne Bay

Lipcon, Marguiles, Alsina & Winkleman, P.A

July 4th is often an exciting time for family and friends to get together to enjoy good times and fireworks. The view from onboard a boat can be quite spectacular, even when a person just wants to star gaze. But as your boating accident lawyer knows, even in the midst of all the beauty in the sky, tragedy can occur. That appears to have been the case this past 4th of July.

According to a recent news article, the 4th of July ended tragically for a number of family members and friends. The story noted that a 32-foot Contender that was carrying one young man’s twin sister and her friends ended up T-boning a 36-foot Carrera that held a family of eight. The crash caused the passengers in the Carrera to fall out and even knocked some individuals unconscious. Ultimately, a third boat was also caught up in the collision. Four people died as a result of the crash and three individuals were critically hurt. Accident investigators noted that the accident ranked as one of the deadliest recreational boating accidents in South Florida, and they commented that they have added alcohol as a potential contributing factor in the accident.

The events that took place that day were devastating for so many families. But the incident stands as yet another reminder of the need for boating safety and the importance for individuals to know the rules of the water.

The Boating Rules in Florida

A well-versed boating accident lawyer is aware that Florida has a number of laws and rules with respect to boating. For instance, individuals should be aware of who is permitted to operate a vessel in the state. If a vessel (including personal watercrafts) is powered by a motor that is 10 horsepower or higher, any individual born on or after January 1 of 1988 who operates the vessel must have taken and completed a boater education class that has been approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (or they must have passed an equivalency test).

Those who are required to complete the class or take the test must carry a picture identification card and a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) issued boating safety education ID card. As of October 1, 2011, the rules also allow for an individual to carry his or her course completion certificate that shows successful course completion in the alternative, along with a photo ID. Additionally, no person under age 14 is allowed to operate any personal watercraft in Florida on any occasion, even if he or she has a boating safety education ID card, and no one under 18 years of age will be allowed to rent or lease a personal watercraft.

Boaters should also note that it is illegal to operate a vessel at an improper speed that is greater than the posted speed. Additionally, it is illegal to operate vessels in a careless manner such that the operator fails to prevent the endangerment of one’s life, limbs or property. Also, boaters are not permitted to operate vessels beyond the maximum horsepower or load, nor are they permitted to allow individuals to ride on a raised deck, bow or gunwale of a vessel where there is a chance that the person may fall overboard.

Perhaps most importantly, the same or similar rules apply to boating as they do to vehicles as it relates to drinking alcohol. Put simply, you cannot and should drink and operate a vessel. Alcohol is the greatest danger at sea, and despite the fact that drinking and boating is very common, there are far fewer Boating under the influence arrests as there are Driving under the influence.

If you or someone you love has been injured in a boating accident, contact a skilled boating accident lawyer at Lipcon, Margulies, Alsina & Winkleman, P.A. right away.