Gold Coast Residents Continue To Protest Cruise Ship Terminal

Lipcon, Marguiles, Alsina & Winkleman, P.A

Around 2,000 people came together last week at the Save Our Spit protest in hopes that their efforts would discourage legislators from creating a cruise ship terminal in Broadwater. Along with Broadwater, another possible terminal site was discussed for North Kirra, Bilinga, but there is no word on when or even if construction will begin. According to Dennis Hughes, executive director of the Gold Coast Ocean Company, the Kirra project had been “shelved” for the moment as legislators work on the Broadwater proposal.

“The North Kirra plan has been on the drawing board for a long time,” he said. However, this isn’t stopping protestors from trying to thwart the project before it even begins.

The Gold Coast Council and Queensland government announced over a week ago that a multimillion-dollar cruise ship terminal would be built at Broadwater, to the dismay of residents. Protest organizer Andy McKinnon, whose group Save Our Southern Beaches Alliance (SOSBA) is also rallying against the proposed terminal at North Kirra, said legislators need to also focus on protecting southern Gold Coast beaches from development that has the potential to hurt the environment.

As far as the Broadwater terminal goes, Hughes explained that $230 million project had already passed through a state government environmental impact process and his team is already working with the federal government on an environmental impact study. Talks regarding the North Kirra project remains at bay, and while Hughes recognizes several residents are opposed to the idea, someone has to budge.

“I know there are people objecting to the North Kirra project, but you can’t win them all,” said Hughes. “They have the right to object, but it’s a small percentage of the community that opposes a cruise ship terminal at North Kirra. We have done a lot of community consulting and our feedback has been very good.”

Yet, one of SOSBA’s members, Andrew McKinnon, refuses to stand down on the issue.

“We are determined to save our beaches,” said McKinnon. “Wherever the marina goes, there will be an impact. We will hang in and fight to protect the quality of life for our community.”

While a new cruise ship terminal might mean more revenue for the area, it can also mean more maritime accidents. A maritime accident can occur both onboard a cruise vessel, cargo ship or other water craft, or it can occur on land at a port. Those who have been hurt either as passengers or crew members have a right to consult with an attorney for assistance in filing a claim and protecting their rights – and that is precisely what our lawyers at Lipcon are here to do.

Our maritime lawyers have over 100 years of combined experience in the field, both in the United States and internationally. We will do our best to protect your rights and help you obtain damages if you qualify.

For more information on your rights, contact our maritime law firm today to schedule a consultation.

PHOTO CREDIT: mydailynews.com.au