Gold Coast Residents Protest Against Development Of Cruise Ship Terminal In Public Land

Lipcon, Marguiles, Alsina & Winkleman, P.A

While there aren’t too many people who don’t enjoy a cruise vacation, a few Southern Gold Coast residents are definitely not happy about a new terminal on the north end of the Australian tourist area that has just received government backing. The residents have come together today in protest against the government’s decision to move forward with the terminal, arguing that the strip might end up with two cruise docks which will destroy public land. Thousands more protestors are also expected at a ‘Save Our Spit’ rally on Sunday.

“There’s no joy for anyone in that announcement,” explained Andrew McKinnon, of the Save Our Southern Beaches Alliance, who organized the protest of the North Kirra cruise ship terminal. “This is bad news. We will be standing side by side with the Save Our Spit campaigners, as they are prepared to stand beside us to protect the southern beaches.”

McKinnon said that the strip did not make for a good location for a cruise ship terminal and locals are not happy with the decision. He went on to say that the decision is the result of “Big business and state government getting together” and urged the government to listen to the requests of the residents.

Yet, the Queensland Government doesn’t seem to have any plans to thwart the cruise terminal efforts, and is attempting to secure one of the country’s largest public-private partnerships in the multibillion-dollar project, known as the Broadwater Marine Project. Not only do the plans call for an integrated cruise ship terminal, but they also call for residential and resort development and a casino – all of which are to be built on public land next to the Broadwater.

The Broadwater Marine Project will be the nation’s largest tourism development to date. Land from north of where the area’s Sea World theme park is located to west of Wavebreak Island will be open for development opportunities. The cruise ship terminal is slated to be completed by 2015, however, the plans are still subject to approval, which can take up to 18 months and anything can happen by then.

While this project may create revenue for the local government, with the creation of a large cruise ship port comes the possibility for accidents to happen both dock-side and onboard any of the vessels. After having successfully handled over 1,000 cruise ship cases, Lipcon, Margulies, Alsina & Winkleman, P.A. know all too well that an accident at a port or on the high seas can happen without warning and lead to serious – if not fatal – injuries. Anyone who has ever been involved in a cruise ship accident, including victims located in Australia, can turn to us for assistance in filing a claim to seek compensation for any injuries or losses that were suffered.

Our maritime lawyers represent clients from various countries, including Australia. Call us today to discuss your maritime claim and protect your rights.

PHOTO SOURCE: The Australian