Our Firm Files Two Wrongful Death Lawsuits Against NCL for Crewmember Deaths

Our firm recently filed two wrongful death cases from the Norwegian Cruise Line lifeboat collapse that took place in the summer of 2016. Almost two years ago, the crew aboard the Norwegian Breakaway was performing routine safety drills on the ship. During the drill, a line on the davit snapped, causing a lifeboat to hang from a single wire. Not long after, the lifeboat fell into the water. The event resulted in the injury and ultimate death of two innocent crewmembers.

One of the crew, Diogenes Carpio, was killed immediately. The second, Ben Buenaventura, sustained serious injuries that led to his death one month later. Both men were Filipino citizens who worked for the cruise line. We reported on the tragic and preventable event when it occurred, and are now ready to vigorously fight for justice for both families so that they can receive the compensation  they deserve.

Our Maritime Lawyers Explain the Double Tragedy

As alleged in the Carpio case, Mr. Carpio had been asked to assist in an unusual amount of lifeboat and rescue boat drills. The frequency and quantity of these drills caused both participants and equipment to become exhausted. After entering onto a rescue boat on Deck 7, the cord broke and he fell nearly six stories into the water on top of other crewmembers participating in the drill. NCL management did not properly alert emergency personnel. Ultimately, Carpio drowned due in part to delayed search efforts by the NCL crew, leaving behind a wife and two small children.

As alleged in the BuenaVentura case, Mr. BuenaVentura had also been asked to assist in an unusual amount of lifeboat and rescue boat drills. Similar to the Carpio case, BuenaVentura entered a rescue boat on Deck 7. When the wire cord broke, he fell nearly six stories into the water. When the man overboard alarm was sounded, fellow crewmembers thought it was still part of the drill. BuenaVentura was in the water for an alarming amount of time before the final lifeboat cord broke and the boat fell on top of him. Real emergency personnel were not alerted properly. Ben was eventually flown from Bermuda to Miami where he spent a month in critical care, but ultimately succumbed to his injuries, leaving behind a wife and small child.

This tragic, preventable incident is just one in a recent string of lifeboat deaths or injuries to crewmember working aboard cruise ships.  Remarkably, all of the accidents appear to involve crewmembers who were in lifeboats being lowered or raised during routine drills.

In January 2018, a cable snapped during a lifeboat drill on a P&O Cruises’ voyage which injured multiple crewmembers.

In 2017, a lifeboat collapsed on the Royal Caribbean Grandeur of the Seas.  Fortunatley, no one was in the lifeboat.

And in September of 2016, just months after the NCL Breakaway incident, two crew were killed and several others injured after a lifeboat collapse on the Royal Caribbean Harmony of the Seas, while in France.

These are just a few of the literally dozens of similar events that plague the seas and must be stopped.  LMAW hopes that this lawsuit which seeks to hold NCL and related defendants accountable will further raise awareness regarding the dangers during lifeboat drills.

LMAW, PA Understands Your Loss

Ultimately, we allege that both deaths could have been prevented if Norwegian Cruise Line had not demonstrated such grievous negligence. Our firm understands that filing a lawsuit against a major cruise line such as NCL can be an intimidating process. However, these companies must be held accountable for their actions, so that future deaths can be prevented, and you can find a sense of closure.

Although no amount of money can ever undo the loss of a loved one, it can help you take the next step to move forward with your life. If you have experienced a cruise-related tragedy such as a lost or injured loved one, we are here to help. The maritime lawyers on our team are prepared to assist you. Simply contact us today to get started.